Enviromental Writing

Environmental Writing: 10 Easy Tips to Get You Started Now!

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by Alisha Shabnam

Have you always been interested in environmental writing and environmentalism but never knew how to get your start? If you have a passion for the planet and want to learn how to use your voice to make a difference, this blog post is for you.

Here are 10 tips on how to begin Environmental writing:

1. Find your niche:

The first step to becoming a successful environmental writer is to find your niche. Whether you’re passionate about climate change, animal rights, or sustainable living, there’s a place for you in environmental writing.

Although environmental writing covers a broad range of topics, you’ll have much better luck starting off if you find your niche within this realm. If you want to focus on climate change, try to find a way to make what you’re writing about relevant.

For example, if you’re interested in writing about species extinction, why not look into the effect species extinction has on our global economy? Or, if you’re passionate about wildlife conservation, consider the impact wildlife conservation can have on rural communities.

The possibilities are endless, but you must find something that interests you and others. If your interest is genuinely piqued by something, chances are, so are other people. Once you’ve found your niche, you can build a following of like-minded individuals interested in what you have to say and start your environmental writing journey.

2. Educate yourself:

To be taken seriously as an environmental writer, you must educate yourself on the issues you’re writing about.

Environmental writing is the process of communicating scientific, political, economic, and social issues within environmentalism to the public and media. There is no set formula for becoming an environmental writer. If you want your environmental writing to be taken seriously, it’s essential to educate yourself on the issues you’re writing about. Be sure to read up on the news and research in your field to provide accurate and up-to-date information to your readers.

This doesn’t mean you have to be an expert (because, honestly, no one really is), but if a reader comes across a paragraph about climate change, for example, and it’s riddled with basic errors, they are going to lose trust in you.

3. Find your voice:

Your writing should be clear, concise, and, most importantly, authentic. Be sure to write in your voice, and avoid sounding like a preachy or boring academic. Instead, let your personality shine through in your writing and engage with your readers personally.

Your job as an environmental writer is to engage your readers on a deep level, inspiring them to feel something—to be shocked, angered, or delighted, but most importantly, to learn something. To do this, you need to find your voice and tell a story that people will want to know more about.

You know how news works if you are a journalist or blogger. The best stories elicit a wide range of emotions: Something important happened, and we want to read all about it. When it comes to environmental writing, the stories often linger around sadness, anger, and alarmism. When you’re writing about a man-made disaster like the Alberta oil spill or climate change’s impact on food security in Kenya, it’s important to draw attention to these issues.

4. Be persuasive:

As an environmental writer, it’s important to be persuasive. After all, your goal is to convince your readers to care about the environmental issues you’re writing about. To do this, you’ll need to use strong arguments and back up your claims with evidence. Your article should begin with a clear explanation of the problem. Give your readers reasons to care. Why is it important? What’s at stake? What will be lost if nothing is done? Once you’ve told the reader what the problem is, briefly explain how it came about and affects people and the environment.

5. Get involved:

One of the best ways to make a difference as an environmental writer is to get involved with the issues you care about. Attend rallies, write letters to your representatives, and support organizations working to make a difference. Environmental writing will be more effective if you can back it up with real-world action. Start with organizations that already speak to your values and look into what they’re currently advocating for.

Even if you’re not a journalist, this is where you can get started with your environmental writing. When you follow an issue, you can anticipate changes and developments in the story. And then, when those changes happen- write about it! Share your thoughts with other writers and readers online, especially if it’s a recent development in the story.

Write what you know. If you want to write about bees, then read research articles on bees or visit them in their natural habitat. If you want to write about clean drinking water, volunteer for a water filtration system in an impoverished community. Make sure you’re informed about the topic before you write about it. If it’s accurately represented in your life or on the news, it will be even more effective when you share it with others.

Share what you know.

6. Connect with other writers:

You’re not alone in your environmental writing journey. Connect with other writers in person or online and share tips, advice, and stories.

There are many ways to connect with other writers, whether you’re looking to learn more about their work or simply share ideas.

Here are a few tips:

  • Join an online community of environmental writers. This can be a great way to get in touch with other colleagues and learn about their projects and thoughts on the environment.
  • Attend conferences and workshops related to environmental writing. These events can give you the chance to meet other professionals and hear from interesting angles on issues surrounding the environment.
  • Talk to your local libraries about setting up bookshelves devoted to environmental issues. This can be a great way for you to gain knowledge about different types of writing and find works that interest you.

7. Know your audience:

It’s important to know who you’re writing for. Are you aiming your content at fellow environmentalists? Or are you trying to reach a broader audience with your message? Keep your audience in mind when you’re crafting your content, and tailor your writing to appeal to them.

8. Keep it simple:

When you’re just starting out, it’s important to keep your writing simple. Use clear and concise language that everyone can understand. Avoid jargon and technical terms, and focus on communicating your message in a way that’s easy to digest.

9. Be passionate:

One of the most important qualities of a successful environmental writer is passion. A career in environmental writing can offer a lot of job satisfaction, but it is not an ideal career for those who are only lukewarm about their work. If you’re not passionate about the topic you’re writing about, it will be challenging to engage your audience and get them interested in what you have to say. Write about topics you’re passionate about, and let that passion shine through in your writing.

10. Be persistent:

Environmental writing can be a challenging field to break into, but if you’re persistent, you’ll eventually find your audience. Keep writing, keep networking, and keep promoting your work, and you’ll eventually find success.

Conclusion

Environmental writing can be an incredibly rewarding career, so it’s no wonder that so many people want to do it, especially in a world where the environment is such a hot-button issue. The problem is many people give up on the idea of becoming an environmental writer before they even get started. You see, in the past, there haven’t been many opportunities for those who wanted to become environmental writers, but that’s changing. With the right mindset, anyone can make a name for themselves as an environmental writer.

FAQ

How do you become an environmental writer?

There is no set formula for becoming an environmental writer. Environmental writers typically earn a bachelor’s degree in journalism, life science, English, or writing. 

What does an environmental journalist do?

As an environmental writer, your goal is to convince your readers to care about the environmental issues you’re writing about. Your article should begin with a clear explanation of the problem, Once you’ve told the reader what the problem is, briefly explain how it came about and affects people and the environment.

What is a sustainability writer?

Environmental writing is the process of communicating scientific, political, economic, and social issues within environmentalism to the public and media.

About
Alisha Shabnam

Hi! I’m Alisha Shabnam, a freelance Sustainability Consultant and writer working in the field of sustainability education.